In 2020, Earth has either broken historic monthly climate records, or come close, as the planet continues its relentless warming trend.

 

The American economy has seriously sputtered during the coronavirus pandemic, but the planet’s relentless warming trend hasn’t. After Earth experienced its second-hottest year in 140 years of record-keeping in 2019, the first few months of this year have either broken historic monthly records, or come close. January 2020 was the warmest January on record. February 2020 was the second hottest such month on record. And on Monday, the European Union’s climate monitoring agency EU Copernicus reported that March 2020 was "on par" with the second and third warmest Marches on record. 

 

 

Sourced through Scoop.it from: mashable.com

Using a novel multiplexed immuno-biosensor, Hememics is trying to provide a rapid detection solution of COVID-19 anywhere in the world. Rapid, cost-effective and real-time biomarker measurements are essential for quick and effective diagnosis and treatment of emerging diseases like COVID-19.

 

Hememics has developed a diagnostic test platform that can yield sensitive, selective, and measurable signals in response to specific antibodies and antigens in 60 seconds or less, with a single nasal swab or drop of blood. Testing is simple and could be administered by any health care worker, anywhere: ambulances, emergency rooms, community clinics, and makeshift hospitals.

Most importantly, this Bluetooth® connected technology transmits the test results to a cloud-based data management network, enabling real-time geographical alerts of outbreaks or travel screening at airports, borders, and transportation terminals.

 

The multiplex chip device can simultaneously detect up to 17 pathogens from blood or nasal swab.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.hememics.com

Some 484 million miles from coronavirus-beleaguered Earth lies the gas giant Jupiter, and its stormy, magnificent atmosphere. One of the latest images NASA’s Juno spacecraft sent back to Earth shows a view of the planet’s churning northern region. Juno captured it on Feb. 17, during a "close" swing by Jupiter — which means Juno was some 15,610 miles above these clouds.

 

Of particular interest amid the swirling clouds and spinning storms are the thin, hazy bands, which run from top to bottom in the image. They are atmospheric particles floating above Jupiter’s famous, tumultuous clouds. "Scientists don’t yet know exactly what these hazes are made of or how they form," writes NASA. 

 

A full suite Juno’s imagery of Jupiter — "the king of planets" — can be found here.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.nasa.gov

With many stuck at home during the pandemic, Americans have been spending more of their lives online. This is how our habits have changed.

 

Stuck at home during the coronavirus pandemic, with movie theaters closed and no restaurants to dine in, Americans have been spending more of their lives online. But a New York Times analysis of internet usage in the United States from SimilarWeb and Apptopia, two online data providers, reveals that our behaviors shifted, sometimes starkly, as the virus spread and pushed us to our devices for work, play and connecting.

 

In the past few years, users of these services were increasingly moving to their smartphones, creating an industrywide focus on mobile. Now that we are spending our days at home, with computers close at hand, Americans appear to be remembering how unpleasant it can be to squint at those little phone screens.

 

Facebook, Netflix and YouTube have all seen user numbers on their phone apps stagnate or fall off as their websites have grown, the data from SimilarWeb and Apptopia indicates. SimilarWeb and Apptopia both draw their traffic numbers from several independent sources to create data that can be compared across the internet.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.nytimes.com

For the 30th anniversary of one of the most iconic images taken by NASA’s Voyager mission, a new version of the image known as "the Pale Blue Dot."

 

Planet Earth is visible as a bright speck within the sunbeam just right of center and appears softly blue, as in the original version published in 1990 (see PIA00452). This updated version uses modern image-processing software and techniques to revisit the well-known Voyager view while attempting to respect the original data and intent of those who planned the images.

 

In 1990, the Voyager project planned to shut off the Voyager 1 spacecraft’s imaging cameras to conserve power and because the probe, along with its sibling Voyager 2, would not fly close enough to any other objects to take pictures. Before the shutdown, the mission commanded the probe to take a series of 60 images designed to produce what they termed the "Family Portrait of the Solar System." Executed on Valentine’s Day 1990, this sequence returned images for making color views of six of the solar system’s planets and also imaged the Sun in monochrome.

 

 

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.jpl.nasa.gov

In this video, Tesla engineers break down how they’re repurposing Tesla parts to build ventilators for COVID-19 (coronavirus) patients.

Two weeks after an Elon Musk ventilator snafu that saw Tesla ship out about 1,000 B-PAP machines—which do not include the necessary ventilation tubes that the life-saving breathing machines require—the luxury car manufacturer has gone back to the drawing board.

Now, Tesla is giving us a glimpse into its process. In a new video (seen above), company engineers break down how they’re repurposing Tesla parts to build ventilators for COVID-19 (coronavirus) patients—something that Ford and General Motors have also been doing, thanks to the stockpiles of parts that auto manufacturers keep on hand to maintain a buzzing assembly line.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.popularmechanics.com

Despite being the closest planet to the Sun, Mercury is home to a surprising amount of ice. Now, researchers at Georgia Tech have put forward an explanation for how at least some of it got there – and it turns out, the heat plays an important role.

 

Most of Mercury is a broiling hot hell, where daytime temperatures peak at a toasty 427 °C (800 °F). But with no atmosphere to spread the heat around, the poles remain chilly, and the floors of some deep craters never see sunlight. There, temperatures can be as low as -170 °C (-274 °F) – the perfect conditions for ice to form.

And form it does, with spacecraft observations and other calculations showing large deposits at both poles of the planet. How it actually got there in the first place has remained a mystery, but now the Georgia Tech team has proposed at least a partial explanation.

 

 

Sourced through Scoop.it from: newatlas.com

Old human cells return to a more youthful and vigorous state after being induced to briefly express a panel of proteins involved in embryonic development, according to a new study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine. The researchers also found that elderly mice regained youthful strength after their existing muscle stem cells were subjected to the rejuvenating protein treatment and transplanted back into their bodies.

 

The proteins, known as Yamanaka factors, are commonly used to transform an adult cell into what are known as induced pluripotent stem cells, or iPS cells. Induced pluripotent stem cells can become nearly any type of cell in the body, regardless of the cell from which they originated. They’ve become important in regenerative medicine and drug discovery.

 

 

 

 

Sourced through Scoop.it from: med.stanford.edu

Hayley Clissold from the Sanger Institute’s policy team team explores the issues surrounding gene editing and human embryos.

 

Genome editing is a technique used to modify a specific section of DNA. As all living things contain DNA, genome editing has an almost unlimited range of applications in organisms including bacteria, plants, animals and humans.

 

Genome editing is not a new technology. In fact, it has been around for decades. Genome editing has only recently taken the scientific world by storm because of the discovery of a new tool called CRISPR. CRISPR is simpler, faster, cheaper and much more efficient than any of its predecessor genome editing tools and because of its accessibility, CRISPR is now used in a vast spectrum of applications in labs all around the world.

 

CRISPR was originally discovered as a bacterial immune system. Some bacteria deploy CRISPR as a defense mechanism to chop up the DNA of an invading virus. Because of its ability to target and cut specific stretches of DNA, CRISPR is capable of removing any particular sequence – for example, disease-causing gene variants can be taken out of a genome. The technology also allows DNA sequences to be added or changed – so a disease-causing variant can be replaced with a ‘healthy’ one. Clearly, this technology offers almost limitless possibilities for science and in particular for healthcare.

 

Sourced through Scoop.it from: sangerinstitute.blog