Barbra Streisand is not alone. At a South Korean laboratory, a once-disgraced doctor is replicating hundreds of deceased pets for the rich and famous. It’s made for more than a few questions of bioethics.

 

The surgeon is a showman. Scrubbed in and surrounded by his surgical team, a lavalier mike clipped to his mask, he gestures broadly as he describes the C-section he is about to perform to a handful of rapt students watching from behind a plexiglass wall. Still narrating, he steps over to a steel operating table where the expectant mother is stretched out, fully anesthetized. All but her lower stomach is discreetly covered by a crisp green cloth. The surgeon makes a quick incision in her belly. His assistants tug gingerly on clamps that pull back the flaps of tissue on either side of the cut. The surgeon slips two gloved fingers inside the widening hole, then his entire hand. An EKG monitor shows the mother’s heart beating in steady pulses. Just like that the baby’s head pops out, followed by its tiny body. Nurses soak up fluids filling its mouth so the tyke can breathe. The surgeon cuts the umbilical cord. After some tender shaking, the little one moves his head and starts to cry. Looking triumphant, the surgeon holds up the newborn for the students to see—a baby boy that isn’t given a name but a number: That’s because he is a clone. One of many.

 

 

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.vanityfair.com

New archaeological research from The Australian National University (ANU) has found that Homo erectus, an extinct species of primitive humans, went extinct in part because they were ‘lazy’.

 

An archaeological excavation of ancient human populations in the Arabian Peninsula during the Early Stone Age, found that Homo erectus used ‘least-effort strategies’ for tool making and collecting resources. This ‘laziness’ paired with an inability to adapt to a changing climate likely played a role in the species going extinct, according to lead researcher Dr. Ceri Shipton of the ANU School of Culture, History and Language. "They really don’t seem to have been pushing themselves," Dr. Shipton said. "I don’t get the sense they were explorers looking over the horizon. They didn’t have that same sense of wonder that we have."

 

 

Sourced through Scoop.it from: phys.org

Flying cars are being developed by companies spanning from new startups like Ehang and Pal-V, to industry giants like Airbus and Rolls-Royce.

 

Not long ago, the idea of traveling by flying car was pure science fiction. The Jetsons made the concept famous, but turning such a machine into reality seemed like a step too far. How should they be governed? Would you need a license? Where would they land and take-off from?

 

 

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.gearbrain.com

Blood Falls is an aptly named feature in Antarctica. The 100-foot stream of water running down the side of a glacier is a deep, rich, blood red.

 

Though we’ve known for decades what causes the red color, it took more than 100 years for scientists to discover the source of Blood Falls: a secret, ancient, underground lake.

 

Blood Falls were first discovered by Australian explorer Griffith Taylor during an expedition in 1911. At the time, he and other explorers guessed that the red color might be caused by algae living in the water.

 

 

 

Sourced through Scoop.it from: motherboard.vice.com

Observations made with ESO’s Very Large Telescope have for the first time revealed the effects predicted by Einstein’s general relativity on the motion of a star passing through the extreme gravitational field near the supermassive black hole in the centre of the Milky Way. This long-sought result represents the climax of a 26-year-long observation campaign using ESO’s telescopes in Chile.

 

 

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.eso.org

The “Onassis Cultural Centre” is Athens’ (Greece), new cultural space hosting events of all spectrum of arts with an emphasis on contemporary cultural expression. Theatre, dance, music, visual arts, written word, to support Greek artists, to cultivate international collaborations and to educate children and people of all ages through life-long learning…. 

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.graphicart-news.com

The expression of a gene involved in female birds’ color vision is linked to the evolution of colorful plumage in males, reports a new study from the University of Chicago. The findings, published Nov. 26 in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B, confirm the essential role of female color perception in mate selection and sexual dimorphism.

 

"This is the first time an aspect of the visual system in birds has been directly associated with plumage evolution," said Natasha Bloch, PhD, who authored the study while a graduate student in ecology & evolution at the University of Chicago. "It tells us color perception plays an important role in the evolution of the spectacular diversity of colors we see in nature."

 

 

Sourced through Scoop.it from: phys.org