Malaria is a deadly disease with no effective vaccine. Physicians thus depend on antimalarial drugs to save lives, but such compounds are often rendered ineffective when parasites evolve resistance. Cowell et al. systematically studied patterns of Plasmodium falciparum genome evolution by analyzing the sequences of clones that were resistant to diverse antimalarial compounds across the P. falciparum life cycle.

 

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he digital landscape moves so fast that it’s difficult to accurately predict what 2018 holds in store. What’s certain, however, is that big data will continue to impact every corner of the business world. And, if advances in artificial intelligence and the internet of things continue to dominate, we are likely to see more businesses become data-driven than ever before.

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his article is about finding the best 3D printing software for every stage of your workflow. Which 3D printing software is best for preparing 3D models to print? How about designing 3D models from scratch? What if you’re an absolute beginner?

Have no fear, we’ve answered all of these questions, together with information on proficiency levels and where they can be downloaded. And the best thing is that all of them are either totally or free for students, educators and open source projects.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: all3dp.com

Lifeguards testing out new drone technology in Australia have saved two people stranded off the coast of New South Wales state, as spotted by Quartz. The drone footage shows a birds-eye view of the ocean before the drone ejects the yellow floatation device, which inflates when it hits the water. The two teenage boys were caught about 700 meters (0.4 miles) offshore at Lennox Head in a swell of around three meters (9.8 feet). They were able to grab onto the floatation device and swim to shore.

 

“I was able to launch it, fly it to the location, and drop the pod all in about one to two minutes,” lifeguard supervisor Jai Sheridan told reporters. A government official confirmed the rescue took only 70 seconds, compared to the average six minutes it would take for a lifeguard to reach the swimmers. The drones were reportedly only unveiled that morning before being put to use, according to the Australian Broadcasting Corporation.

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Chameleons have fluorescent bones which might play a role in sexual attraction.

 

Fluorescence is widespread in marine organisms but uncommon in terrestrial tetrapods. We here show that many chameleon species have bony tubercles protruding from the skull that are visible through their scales, and fluoresce under UV light. Tubercles arising from bones of the skull displace all dermal layers other than a thin, transparent layer of epidermis, creating a ‘window’ onto the bone. In the genus Calumma, the number of these tubercles is sexually dimorphic in most species, suggesting a signaling role, and also strongly reflects species groups, indicating systematic value of these features. Co-option of the known fluorescent properties of bone has never before been shown, yet it is widespread in the chameleons of Madagascar and some African chameleon genera, particularly in those genera living in forested, humid habitats known to have a higher relative component of ambient UV light.

 

The fluorescence emits with a maximum at around 430 nm in blue color which contrasts well to the green and brown background reflectance of forest habitats. This discovery opens new avenues in the study of signaling among chameleons and sexual selection factors driving ornamentation.

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Scientists are one step closer to solving the mystery behind the ‘most mysterious star in the universe.’

 

A team of more than 200 researchers, including Penn State Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics Assistant Professor Jason Wright and led by Louisiana State University’s Tabetha Boyajian, is one step closer to solving the mystery behind the “most mysterious star in the universe.” KIC 8462852, or “Tabby’s Star,” nicknamed after Boyajian, is otherwise an ordinary star, about 50 percent bigger and 1,000 degrees hotter than the Sun, and about than 1,000 light years away. However, it has been inexplicably dimming and brightening sporadically like no other. Several theories abound to explain the star’s unusual light patterns, including that an alien megastructure is orbiting the star.

 

 

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.sciencedaily.com