Scientists have developed a human-friendly, ultra-flexible organic sensor powered by sunlight, which acts as a self-powered heart monitor. Previously, they developed a flexible photovoltaic cell that could be incorporated into textiles. In this study, they directly integrated a sensory device, called an organic electrochemical transistor — a type of electronic device that can be used to measure a variety of biological functions — into a flexible organic solar cell. Using it, they were then able to measure the heartbeats of rats and humans under bright light conditions.

 

 

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.riken.jp

MIT researchers have developed a new way to rapidly manufacture biopharmaceuticals on demand. Their system can be easily reconfigured to produce different drugs, enabling flexible switching between products as they are needed. "Traditional biomanufacturing relies on unique processes for each new molecule that is produced," says J. Christopher Love, a professor of chemical engineering at MIT and a member of MIT’s Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research. "We’ve demonstrated a single hardware configuration that can produce different recombinant proteins in a fully automated, hands-free manner."

 

The researchers have used this manufacturing system, which can fit on a lab benchtop, to produce three different biopharmaceuticals, and showed that they are of comparable quality to commercially available versions. Love is the senior author of the study, which appears in the October 1, 2018 issue of the journal Nature Biotechnology.

 

 

Sourced through Scoop.it from: phys.org

Mammals are unique in many ways. We’re warm-blooded and agile in comparison with our reptilian relatives.

But a new study, funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF) and led by Harvard University researchers Stephanie Pierce and Katrina Jones, suggests we’re unique in one more way — the makeup of our spines. The researchers describe their finding in a paper published this week in the journal Science.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.nsf.gov

The Russian android robot called F.e.d.o.r (Fedor) can do the splits and screw in a light bulb, CEO of Android Technics Research and Production Association Alexander Permyakov told TASS recently. Android Technics is the developer of the robot Fedor. The chief executive confirmed that the robot could do the splits to demonstrate its technical capabilities. Moreover, it can stand on one leg, having vertically lifted the other.

 

Sourced through Scoop.it from: tass.com