NASA’s Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite or TESS is an all-sky survey mission that will discover thousands of exoplanets around nearby bright stars.

 

NASA’s Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) is scheduled to launch no earlier than 6:32 p.m. EDT Monday, April 16, 2018. TESS is on a mission to find planets outside of our solar system and the prelaunch mission coverage will start on NASA Television and the agency’s website Sunday, April 15, with three live briefings.

 

NASA’s Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) is prepared to launch on a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket from Space Launch Complex 40 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida. Once in space, TESS will spend approximately two years monitoring 200,000 of the brightest stars near the sun to detect planets outside our solar system.

 

TESS is NASA’s next step in the search for planets outside of our solar system, called exoplanets, including those that could support life. The mission is expected to catalog thousands of planet candidates and largely increase the current number of known exoplanets.

 

TESS will find the most promising exoplanets orbiting relatively close stars, giving future researchers a vast set of new targets for more comprehensive follow-up studies, such as the potential to assess their capacity to harbor life.

 

Launch Resources:

TESS Launch Blog
TESS Launch Team
TESS Briefings and Events
Launch Campaign Photos

TESS project website at NASA Goddard

TESS Guest Investigator Program Office website

TESS science writers guide

HD multimedia on TESS

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.nasa.gov

If you haven’t heard, universities around the world are offering their courses online for free (or at least partially free). These courses are collectively called MOOCs or Massive Open Online Courses. In the past six years or so, close to 800 universities have created more than 8,000 of these MOOCs. And I’ve been keepin

Sourced through Scoop.it from: qz.com

Scientists at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center and the University of Southern California (USC) Viterbi School of Engineering have demonstrated a neural prosthetic system that can improve a memory by “writing” information “codes” (based on a patient’s specific memory patterns) into the hippocampus of human subjects via an electrode implanted in the hippocampus (a part of the brain involved in making new memories).

 

 

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.kurzweilai.net

A commonly used anti-parasite drug could be the next weapon in the fight against malaria. Researchers from Kenya and the United Kingdom report that dosing people with ivermectin, commonly used in heartworm pills, makes them deadly targets for the mosquitoes that transmit malaria. Nearly all of the mosquitoes in the experiment died after drinking ivermectin-laced blood, they say.

 

While malaria rates have been dropping historically, the disease still afflicts over 200 million people a year, mostly in the developing world, and was responsible for nearly half a million deaths in 2015, according to the WHO. And there are worries that resistance to artemisinin, the drug of choice for combating malaria, could continue to spread beyond southeast Asia, where most resistant strains are currently found.

 

Ivermectin could be another solution, and one that’s easily applicable given the prevalence of the drug. In the study, published last month in The Lancet, the researchers gave 47 malaria patients 600-milligram doses of ivermectin for three consecutive days. That’s around three times the normal dose, but the drug possesses few side effects, and had already been shown to be deadly to mosquitoes when in the bloodstream.

 

 

 

Sourced through Scoop.it from: blogs.discovermagazine.com

True artificial intelligence is on its way, and we aren’t ready for it. Just as our forefathers had trouble visualizing everything from the modern car to the birth of the computer, it’s difficult for most people to imagine how much truly intelligent technology could change our lives as soon as the next decade — and how much we stand to lose if AI goes out of our control.

 

Fortunately, there’s a league of individuals working to ensure that the birth of artificial intelligence isn’t the death of humanity. From Max Tegmark’s Future of Life Institute to the Harvard Kennedy School of Government’s Future Society, the world’s most renowned experts are joining forces to tackle one of the most disruptive technological advancements (and greatest threats) humanity will ever face.

 

Sourced through Scoop.it from: futurism.com

The thick pelt that helps polar bears to survive frigid Arctic winters has inspired a warm, sturdy fiber. Inspired by the microstructure and thermal insulation function of the polar bear hair, a research team led by Professor BAI Hao with ZJU’s College of Chemical and Biological Engineering has used a freeze-spinning technique to continuously fabricate silk fibroin solution into a fiber with aligned porous microstructure.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.zju.edu.cn