Google has developed an artificial intelligence system that is better at spotting breast cancer in mammograms than doctors, a study in the journal Nature suggests. Analysing more than 90,000 women in the UK and US, the AI model reduced the number of false positives by 5.7% in the US and 1.2% in the UK. There was also a reduction of false negatives, where an existing cancer is missed, by 9.4% and 2.7% respectively. The NHS system uses two radiologists to analyse each woman’s X-rays amid an estimated shortfall of more than 1,000 radiologists across the UK. 

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Israeli scientists say a new study has shown that a small molecule called PJ34 has triggered the self-destruction of human pancreatic cancer cells in mice. According to the research, published in the peer-reviewed open-access biomedical journal Oncotarget, the administration of the molecule reduced the number of cancer cells in developed tumors by up to 90 percent in 30 days.

The study was led by Professor Malka Cohen-Armon and her team at Tel Aviv University’s Sackler Faculty of Medicine, in collaboration with Dr. Talia Golan and her team at the Cancer Research Center at Sheba Medical Center, and conducted with transplantations of human pancreatic cancer cells into immunocompromised mice, or xenografts.

 

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https://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-innovative-technologies-and-developments/?&tag=Cancer

 

 

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Garra surinbinnani looks like a stout, brown minnow with the face of a boxer who’s gone one too many rounds. The species makes its home in the fast-flowing, rocky streams of Western Thailand, a region that its namesake, the late conservationist Surin Binnan, devoted himself to protecting.

 

At first glance, Garra surinbinnani looks like a stout, brown minnow with the face of a boxer who’s gone one too many rounds. But the deep gash in its forehead studded with blue spikes is a natural feature whose function remains a mystery.

 

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Described as ”living rocks”, giant land tortoises are lumbering beasts with a reputation for being sluggish in both speed and brainpower. But new research carried out by scientists from the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology (OIST) suggests we have greatly underestimated the intelligence of these creatures, who can not only be trained but also have amazing powers of long-term recall.

 

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