A solar panel that can generate electricity from falling raindrops has been invented, enabling power to flow even when skies cloud over or the sun has set. Solar power installation is soaring globally thanks to costs plunging 90% in the past decade, making it the cheapest electricity in many parts of the world. But the power output can plummet under grey skies and researchers are working to squeeze even more electricity from panels.

 

 

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.theguardian.com

Though still a far-off fantasy in the minds of many, 19 states have passed legislation relating to autonomous vehicles — many starting small by defining terms like “automated driving system,” “dynamic driving task” or “autonomous vehicle.”

 

Additionally, governors from four states have issued executive orders creating councils and working groups of stakeholders and public officials dedicated to looking at how their states should proceed.

 

Where states like Florida have embraced fewer regulations, others, like California, have taken more tightly regulated approaches. Though these states have differed in their approaches, the future of transportation is in the midst of a revolution. 

 

The revolution, in short, means that the traditional rules no longer hold up when applied to the rapidly advancing technology. From the electrification of vehicles to the growth of transportation network companies and automated driving, traditional driving regulations must be updated to keep pace.

 

Self-driving vehicles can already be spotted on test tracks across the country and on public streets in select cities, and several major companies including Ford, Toyota and BMW have all committed to driverless vehicles on American road within five years.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.govtech.com

Flipping the curriculum could help us meet the demands of the artificial-intelligence era

Technologies such as artificial intelligence, robotics, and biotech are redefining what it means to be human—and employable.

Jobs are disappearing as automation replaces the need for people. New occupations are emerging that demand competencies that can transfer across the multiple assignments workers will experience in their lives. The disappearance of global boundaries presents opportunities—and risks—for all workers.

These changes demand a significant, ambitious evolution in how we prepare students for their future in a world that’s increasingly volatile, uncertain, complex, and ambiguous. We need a relevant and modernized education.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

https://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?&tag=modern-education

 

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.edweek.org

The biggest planet in the solar system has no tilt as it moves, so its poles have never been visible from Earth. But in the past two years, with NASA’s Juno spacecraft, scientists have gotten a good look at the top and bottom of the planet for the first time. What they found astounded them: bizarre geometric arrangements of storms, each arrayed around one cyclone over the north and south poles—unlike any storm formation seen in the universe.

 

 

Sourced through Scoop.it from: news.uchicago.edu

From Blade Runner to I, Robot, the big screens of Hollywood have predicted the rise of the machine. Automated intelligences will wait our tables and drive our cabs. They will serve us by performing menial tasks. But fact is now surpassing fiction. Automation has moved beyond the factory assembly line as computers are diagnosing illnesses, providing legal counsel, and make financial and political decisions. And if artificial intelligence really is faster, smarter and more reliable, what are we left with?

The answer is precisely that element which makes us less efficient and slower. Our humanity. But rather than being seen as a weakness, this is actually our strongest suit. It’s one we need to empower, because studies show that as the world becomes increasingly automated, computerised and digitalised, we are losing the very skills that define us as human. Just when we need them the most.

Our empathy is something that computers will always struggle to emulate. We need to celebrate what makes us different from even the smartest of the machines. While the future belongs to those who are able to navigate this increasingly digitalised world of ours, the choicest spoils will fall to those who can combine technological fluency with emotional intelligence.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

https://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?&tag=Empathy

 

https://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?&tag=Emotional+intelligence

 

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.weforum.org

Recent developments in GIS and analytical applications have demonstrated that predicting road conditions, and thus preventing traffic accidents and possibly even traffic in the first place, could be possible. Among other goals, Vision Zero is an initiative by cities and municipalities to reduce traffic fatalities to zero. GIS and spatial analysis could help achieve this goal.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.gislounge.com

It’s hard to pinpoint the dawn of AI gaming supremacy. You could choose Kasparov’s loss in chess, or Lee Sedol’s defeat at the virtual hands of AlphaGo. Another popular option would be when legendaryJeopardy! champion Ken Jennings lost to IBM’s Watson in 2011. Watson could parse the game’s clues and handle wordplay. The two-day match wasn’t close. “I for one welcome our new computer overlords,” Jennings wrote under his final answer.

 

 

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.quantamagazine.org