The World Economic Forum shared the Future of Jobs report in 2018 that provided a list of the growing skills for 2022. Here are the top 10:

– Analytical thinking and innovation
– Active learning and learning strategies
– Creativity, originality, and initiative
– Technology design and programming
– Critical thinking and analysis
– Complex problem-solving
– Leadership and social influence
– Emotional intelligence
– Reasoning, problem-solving, and ideation
– Systems analysis and evaluation

If we look at these 10 skill areas, what types of learning experiences or learning spaces can we create for our students that can address most if not all of them? Looking at these skills individually and thinking about the nature of our work, it can seem overwhelming. However, there are some simple ways to create a space where students can build all of these skills and more.

Here are six ideas to try that can help to address these skills:

 

1. Project-based Learning (PBL)

2. Coding

3. STEAM and Makerspaces

4. Place-based

5. Genius Hour

6. Student-Led PD or Teacher for a Day

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

https://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?&tag=Grit

 

https://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?&tag=Growth+Mindset

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2015/05/13/andragogy-adult-teaching-how-to-teach-ict/

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2017/08/25/adventures-of-learning-how-does-it-happen/

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/?s=life+long+learning

 

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.gettingsmart.com

Unstructured learning is an authentic real-world way of learning. That’s because the real world itself doesn’t have neat compartments or set disciplines for success. It demands adaptability, patience, and a willingness to learn and to use what is learned in the moment. Most of all, it requires us to take full responsibility for what we learn.

 

It’s time to play and to let go of rigid teaching in favour of unstructured learning. For this to happen, teachers have to foster trust in their students. They have to be willing to take a step back and put a little slack on the reins of traditional pedagogy. In short, we need to let things get a little messy. Ease into it—it’s a bold step and it will transform everything.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

https://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?&tag=modern-education

 

Sourced through Scoop.it from: globaldigitalcitizen.org

If schools are supposed to be training the workers of the future, the growing consensus is that most of them are not doing a very good job of it.

 

In a trend that seems long overdue, technology-based companies are increasingly turning inward to bridge the gap between the skills they need employees have and the skills they’re actually graduating from college with.

 

In 8 Critical Skills For A Modern Education, we offered one view of what ‘modern workplace’ skills might look like, and have argued many times that true ’21st-century learning’ should change what work looks like all together.

 

(Nevermind that, in our estimation anyway, the purpose of school is not job training.)

 

Still, companies (for now, anyway) need human workers with certain skills that, increasingly, they just don’t have. It’s nearly 2018, and the concept of 21st-century skills is more than two decades old now.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2015/10/29/if-i-would-own-a-company-what-skills-would-i-expect-from-my-workers-in-21st-century/

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2015/07/19/learning-path-for-professional-21st-century-learning-by-ict-practice/

 

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.teachthought.com

LEARN

It’s no longer enough for teachers to get a credential and then sit back and teach the same content year after year.

 

Richardson says to be part of modern learning, teachers need to actively educate themselves about the context students live in and how they can improve as educators.

“There’s never been a more amazing time to be a learner,” Richardson said. “How are we in education not running towards that in our own personal lives and embracing that?”

It’s not just about connecting on Twitter with other educators or asking for professional development about technology. If teachers are waiting for a planned PD about something they are probably already stuck. “You have to have the disposition of an eight-year old to find your own learning,” Richardson said.

 

Sourced through Scoop.it from: ww2.kqed.org