Does the character of our leaders matter? According to research done by KRW International it really, really, does!

Welcome to a Leadership Channel Podcast on TotalPicture. Joining Peter Clayton today is Fred Kiel, PhD, co-founder of KRW International, the author of Return On Character. For more than thirty years, he has helped Fortune 500 CEOs and senior executives build organizational effectiveness through leadership excellence and mission alignment.

 

Strategy+Business considers Return on Character one of the best business books of 2015.

With Credit Suisse replacing their CEO after years of fines and the future of companies like Uber and Yahoo! being questioned because of bad CEO behavior, (or the current CEO poster boy, infamous former Turing CEO Martin Shkreli), could this be the wakeup call we need to start measuring how the character of a leader impacts their organization’s performance?

For the first time we now have data to measure the correlation. In Return On Character (Harvard Business Review Press,), the findings are revealed from KRW International’s seven-year study on the financial impact of character.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?&tag=LeaderShip

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?&tag=LeaderSkills

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?&tag=Character

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?&tag=Soft+Skills

 

Check also:

 

– http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching?tag=Emotional-Intelligence

 

– http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching?tag=Emotions-and-Learning

 

– http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching?tag=Empathy

 

– http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching?tag=EQ

 

– http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching?tag=Daniel-GOLEMAN

 

 

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.totalpicture.com

During this time of significant educational change, we are forced to ask ourselves, what is the role of the teacher?

Teachers continue to be central to learning, but the role is changing significantly. Our children still need to develop real skills and real knowledge, but they also need to be self-reliant, resilient, and fully capable of re-inventing themselves. This means students must learn how to self-direct their learning.

So if students are self-directing their learning, what’s the role of the teacher?

Teachers build the curriculum/lessons with the individual student based on his/her needs and interests rather than move through a fixed curriculum en masse.

Teachers provide the experiences and tools to access new knowledge in specific areas of interest as facilitators of individual pathways, rather than being a provider of the content or expert in one or every area,Teachers become experts in how people learn, not only in teaching.

Teachers support a community of learners in teams, possibly of multiple ages, rather than alone in classrooms with fixed grades of students.

Teachers have more autonomy over their daily schedule, and can be flexible to adjust their schedules to support student needs.

Teachers provide opportunities for real-world, connected, practical learning rather than isolated academics.
These are the types of changes in the teacher’s role that are fundamental to developing students who are capable of independent learning and reinvention in a rapidly changing world.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2013/05/25/so-whats-the-change-for-teachers-in-21st-century-education/

 

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.wab.edu

We saw tons of new stuff at CES this year. But one thing that particularly caught our eye was Kubo, the robot that teaches kids how to code.

Kubo is a pretty simple robot – it’s about the size of a can of soda and has two wheels that allow it to roll around a desk or table. But what it lacks in advanced physical ability it makes up for in brains.

Kubo comes with its own programming language called TagTile. The language consists of puzzle pieces that fit together to give Kubo instructions. For example, you could connect three pieces together – forward, turn, then another forward. Kubo then drives over these pieces oncer to “learn” the command, then can remember and perform it without needing the pieces.

Kubo reads the puzzle pieces using an RFID technology – each piece has an individual embedded RFID tag, and Kubo itself has a reader built in.

While it sounds simple, it’s a pretty good way to teach kids the basics of programming without having them stare at a screen.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Ideas+for+makerspaces

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2014/08/24/coding-a-new-trend-in-education-and-a-big-responsibility/

 

Sourced through Scoop.it from: techcrunch.com

Schools nowadays are required to learn faster than ever before in order to deal effectively with the growing pressures of a rapidly changing environment. Many schools however, look much the same today as they did a generation ago, and too many teachers are not developing the pedagogies and practices required to meet the diverse needs of 21st-century learners.

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=modern-education

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Rise+of+the+Professional+Educator

 

Sourced through Scoop.it from: oecdeducationtoday.blogspot.ch

By teaching students these skills in an authentic, applicable way, will they see each other differently? It’s worth finding out. With so many curricular and time restraints on teachers, how can we be expected to explicitly teach empathy in a meaningful way?

A Definition Of Empathy

Webster’s dictionary defines empathy as: the action of understanding, being aware of, being sensitive to, and vicariously experiencing the feelings, thoughts, and experience of another of either in the past or present without having the feelings, thoughts, and experience fully communicated in an objectively explicit manner; also: the capacity for this.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Empathy

 

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.teachthought.com

Pushing our students to adopt a growth mindset is an easy call. Adopting one ourselves is harder.

 

Having a growth mindset doesn’t just mean learning about the theory and leaving it at that. It’s a constant process. Sometimes it’s difficult, often it’s a little painful, but it’s always worth the effort.

Six Tips for Instilling a Growth Mindset in Yourself

Focus on the hard stuff

 

Try innovative solutions, and if they don’t work, try some more.

 

Seek feedback wherever you can.

 

Reflect at the end of every day, especially the bad ones.

 

Notice the areas where you have a fixed mindset.

 

There’s a catch to learning a lot about growth mindset. Once we learn just how much of our lack of growth is a product of our attitude, it’s not so easy to write things off as impossible anymore.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Growth+Mindset

 

 

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.edutopia.org

Introduction. I’m celebrating writing my 100th post, by trying to link together various posts relating to teaching.  I suggest in my post ‘How do I know how good my teachers are?’ that there are three key sources that contribute to my judgement of the effectiveness of my teaching staff: Data – the measured outcomes from…

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Rise+of+the+Professional+Educator

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Empathy

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Soft+Skills

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Growth+Mindset

 

Sourced through Scoop.it from: headguruteacher.com

As the world economy shifts away from manufacturing jobs and towards service industry and creative jobs, there’s a consensus among parents, educators, politicians and business leaders that it is crucial students graduate into university or the workforce with the ability to identify and solve complex problems, think critically about information, work effectively in teams and communicate clearly about their thinking.

 

Originally developed by Rotman’s former dean, Roger Martin, integrative thinking is a broad term to describe looking for solutions through the tensions inherent in different viewpoints. Martin noticed that effective CEOs understood that their own world view was limited, so they sought out opposing viewpoints and came to creative solutions by leveraging seemingly opposing positions. For the past seven years, a spin-off group called the I-Think Initiative has been training teachers in the Toronto area on how integrative thinking can build critical thinking in students from a young age.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching?tag=Critical-Thinking

 

Sourced through Scoop.it from: ww2.kqed.org

Skills young people should be learning to be prepared for a career in 2020 include:

The ability to concentrate, to focus deeply.

 

The ability to distinguish between the “noise” and the message in the ever-growing sea of information.

 

The ability to do public problem solving through cooperative work.

 

The ability to search effectively for information and to be able to discern the quality and veracity of the information one finds and then communicate these findings well.

 

Synthesizing skills (being able to bring together details from many sources).

 

The capability to be futures-minded through formal education in the practices of horizon-scanning, trends analysis and strategic foresight.”

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2015/05/26/what-are-the-skills-needed-from-students-in-the-future/

 

Sourced through Scoop.it from: workfutures.io

Unexpected disruptions, plans gone awry, added mess to a project or lesson — it all makes us uncomfortable. And that aversion to an unexpected hitch in the plan makes sense. “We don’t want to overcome unnecessary hurdles,” says Tim Harford is his TED talk about why those messy situations lead to the best results. He gives examples in disparate fields like music production, performances, classrooms, psychology and engineering where unexpected disruptions actually make people more creative.

 

Sourced through Scoop.it from: ww2.kqed.org