“Over the last few years I’ve seen more schools opening up access to YouTube, at least to teachers, than I had in the past. YouTube for Schools has partially contributed to that trend. Tools like ViewPure and Watchkin have made using YouTube videos in schools a little less scary too. All that said, there are still lots of schools that block access to YouTube. That’s why a few years ago I started to maintain a list of alternatives to YouTube.”

Source: www.freetech4teachers.com

See on Scoop.itCommunication design

Temple University researchers recently put together the world’s largest tree of life visualized across time. The family tree of living and extinct organisms encompasses 50,000 species—only a fraction of the world’s history of life—and would easily take up hundreds of pages if laid out linearly. To fit their work onto a printed page, the researchers, led by evolutionary biologist S. Blair Hedges, instead decided to visualize the data as a spiral.

Source: www.fastcodesign.com

March 20, 2015
Here are some very useful educational web tools we have curated over the last few weeks. These are EdTech tools we came across through posts from other edubloggers. As is the case with previous posts in New EdTech Web Tools for Teachers, we only feature the recent trending tools which we think would be a valued addition to teachers technology toolkit. Check out the ones we have for you today and share with us if you have other suggestions to add to the list:


Find out more here:


– http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-tools-for-teaching-people-and-learners


Source: www.educatorstechnology.com

Artist Emily Garfield maps places that don’t exist. “I think that’s related to the way cities grow in real life.”

Emily Garfield like to say that she grows cities. With pen, ink, and watercolor, the Boston-based artist creates maps of imaginary places that tap into the essence of urban form.

Garfield has long been interested by the presentation of architecture in visual art. The inviting, surrealist arcades and sidewalks of the Italian painter Giorgio de Chirico inspired Garfield to begin producing her own street-level dreamscapes as an art student at Brown University.

But it was when she created her first aerial view of a fantasy city—an abstract web of streets, bridges, and blocks—that she got a particularly positive response from other people. Even without any text, Garfield’s drawings were strongly recognizable as maps…

Source: www.citylab.com

See on Scoop.itCommunication design