A collaboration of physicists and a mathematician has made a significant step toward unifying general relativity and quantum mechanics by explaining how spacetime emerges from quantum entanglement in a more fundamental theory. 

 

Physicists and mathematicians have long sought a Theory of Everything (ToE) that unifies general relativity and quantum mechanics. General relativity explains gravity and large-scale phenomena such as the dynamics of stars and galaxies in the universe, while quantum mechanics explains microscopic phenomena from the subatomic to molecular scales.

 

 

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.sciencedaily.com

“La Fête du Slip”:http://www.lafeteduslip.ch/2016/en/home/ is an annual event in Switzerland that aims to convey a “positive and celebratory approach to sexualities,” and through a series of creative events it addresses ideas surrounding gender, body image and sex. While the festival is an important event, which covers many issues, there’s a tongue-in-cheek flavour to the whole programme. As such, Berlin-based studio Dual Room has adopted a similar mischievous approach for the identity that’s been inspired by the glory hole – a universal cavern, devoid of judgement.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.itsnicethat.com

1. SEO is dead

2. SEO is about adding the right keywords

3. SEO is about ranking #1 on SERPs

4. The more webpages you have, the better the ranking

5. Image optimisation is not necessary

6. Mobile optimisation is overrated

7. SEO is not working for me

8. Link building is dead

9. Social media does not affect SEO

10. Local SEO is not for everyone

11. Don’t worry about SEO just create good content

Sourced through Scoop.it from: searchenginewatch.com

Researchers have uncovered deep connections among different types of random objects, illuminating hidden geometric structures.

 

Standard geometric objects can be described by simple rules — every straight line, for example, is just y = ax + b — and they stand in neat relation to each other: Connect two points to make a line, connect four line segments to make a square, connect six squares to make a cube.

 

These are not the kinds of objects that concern Scott Sheffield. Sheffield, a professor of mathematics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, studies shapes that are constructed by random processes. No two of them are ever exactly alike.

 

Consider the most familiar random shape, the random walk, which shows up everywhere from the movement of financial asset prices to the path of particles in quantum physics. These walks are described as random because no knowledge of the path up to a given point can allow you to predict where it will go next.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.wired.com