Scientists at CERN have been using new techniques to try and learn more about the tiniest particles in our universe. One unusual method they’ve utilised is to turn data from the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) into sounds – using music as a language to translate what they find.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: home.cern

While it’s clear print is here to stay a little longer, the debate has recently shifted towards how we ensure it does by innovating approaches to magazine-making. Gym Class Magazine has continually touted the magazines that push the format and in its latest issue, which came out last week, one article discusses how publications are using the power of magazine covers to stand out in the digital age. Written by Colin Crummy (film editor at i-D and contributing editor at Esquire), the journalist draws upon on recent examples including Kim Kardashian’s Break the Internet cover for_ Paper to illustrate the impact covers can still have. The magazine has kindly let us reprint an extract from the article below.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.itsnicethat.com

How can virtual reality help to preserve historical heritage? In this episode of Futuris, show host Julián López Gómez travels to both Germany and Spain…

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Virtual+Reality

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-innovative-technologies-and-developments/?tag=Virtual+Reality+System

 

 

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.youtube.com

How can virtual reality help to preserve historical heritage? In this episode of Futuris, show host Julián López Gómez travels to both Germany and Spain…

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Virtual+Reality

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-innovative-technologies-and-developments/?tag=Virtual+Reality+System

 

 

 

Frank Vinluan  This printed sensor system from Molex integrates printed conductive and dielectric materials along with traditional components.In many medical devices, the conventional printed circuit board is a perfectly logical electronics solution. Affixing electronic components to rigid FR-4 boards is a mature and established technology. But medical device designs are coming in smaller, sleeker shapes that can be worn by patients.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.mddionline.com