Recent developments in GIS and analytical applications have demonstrated that predicting road conditions, and thus preventing traffic accidents and possibly even traffic in the first place, could be possible. Among other goals, Vision Zero is an initiative by cities and municipalities to reduce traffic fatalities to zero. GIS and spatial analysis could help achieve this goal.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.gislounge.com

It’s hard to pinpoint the dawn of AI gaming supremacy. You could choose Kasparov’s loss in chess, or Lee Sedol’s defeat at the virtual hands of AlphaGo. Another popular option would be when legendaryJeopardy! champion Ken Jennings lost to IBM’s Watson in 2011. Watson could parse the game’s clues and handle wordplay. The two-day match wasn’t close. “I for one welcome our new computer overlords,” Jennings wrote under his final answer.

 

 

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.quantamagazine.org

Computer engineers study the mathematics of how to optimize complex systems. In one example, they face a logistics challenge known as the “travelling salesman problem:” how can a hypothetical salesperson visit every city on their route in the shortest distance?

The algorithms developed to answer these sorts of questions are useful in many situations, such as reducing the costs of and pollution from a fleet of delivery trucks. But when engineers tried to optimize traffic on the internet, they found their methods wanting. […]

Honeybees don’t study mathematics, but the demands of evolution reward those colonies that succeed in optimizing their resources. Fortunately, in the strange tale of how honeybees make the internet work, the scientists were smart enough to see that the honeybees knew better than they did.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.treehugger.com

Hand gestures are one means of illustrating geological concepts, like the orientation of these fractures in 2.5-billion-year-old rocks in Dales Gorge, Hamersley Basin, Australia. A recent study showed that students master spatial concepts more quickly when they make concrete illustrations of their mental images and then receive immediate feedback on how closely these concepts mirror physical reality.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: eos.org