True artificial intelligence is on its way, and we aren’t ready for it. Just as our forefathers had trouble visualizing everything from the modern car to the birth of the computer, it’s difficult for most people to imagine how much truly intelligent technology could change our lives as soon as the next decade — and how much we stand to lose if AI goes out of our control.

 

Fortunately, there’s a league of individuals working to ensure that the birth of artificial intelligence isn’t the death of humanity. From Max Tegmark’s Future of Life Institute to the Harvard Kennedy School of Government’s Future Society, the world’s most renowned experts are joining forces to tackle one of the most disruptive technological advancements (and greatest threats) humanity will ever face.

 

Sourced through Scoop.it from: futurism.com

The thick pelt that helps polar bears to survive frigid Arctic winters has inspired a warm, sturdy fiber. Inspired by the microstructure and thermal insulation function of the polar bear hair, a research team led by Professor BAI Hao with ZJU’s College of Chemical and Biological Engineering has used a freeze-spinning technique to continuously fabricate silk fibroin solution into a fiber with aligned porous microstructure.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.zju.edu.cn

For some people, artificial intelligence still makes them feel a little…uneasy. It’s often depicted as sinister-looking robots who will take over our lives and our jobs, or even replace humanity. 

The reality is, we are already in an age in which AI is infused into our everyday lives in ways that augment rather than replace people. Digital assistants such as Cortana can find you the closest restaurant, dictate a text to your friend, manage your email inbox and even help you create more beautiful PowerPoint presentations.  Whether you realise it or not, AI is an integral part of all these interactions. And while it’s not something you can often see or touch, I bet you’re already experiencing the benefits of AI every day.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.huffingtonpost.co.uk

Fast Radio Bursts (FRBs) have been one of the more puzzling and fascinating areas of astronomical study ever since the first was detected in 2007 (known as the Lorimer Burst). Much like gravitational waves, the study of these short-lived radio pulses (which last only a few milliseconds) is still in its infancy, and only a 33 events have been detected. What’s more, scientists are still not sure what accounts for them. In early March 2018, scientists using the Parkes Radio Telescope detected three FRBs, one of which was the brightest ever observed.

 

 

 

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.universetoday.com

Addiction to substances such as heroin and alcohol affect women differently than men. A 2010 American Journal of Public Health study found that women were more likely to be prescribed opioids than men and to continue them long-term. Another study of chronic pain patients prescribed opioids in the Journal of Pain revealed that women’s increased risk of opioid misuse was related to emotional issues while men misused opioids because of legal and behavioral problems.

 

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), women are more likely to have chronic pain, be prescribed prescription painkillers and at higher doses than men; and become dependent more quickly than men. From 1999 to 2010, CDC data revealed that 48,000 women died of prescription-related overdoses. During this timeframe, prescription overdose deaths increased over 400% among women, versus 237% among men. The sobering statistics don’t end with prescriptions. The National Center for Health Statistics reported heroin overdose deaths among women tripled from 2010 through 2013.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.forbes.com

A new mapping application allows anyone with a computer to get a snapshot of the number and types of crime in their neighborhood or anywhere else in the city.

Developed with the help of the Long Beach Technology and Innovation Department and the supplier ArcGIS, the interactive map uses the last six months of data obtained from the police department’s Records Management System to show all of the reported crime incidents. A test showed there is information as recent as the week before in the system.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.presstelegram.com

 

In a study published March 9 in The Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, astronomers announced the discovery that all disk galaxies rotate about once every billion years, no matter their size or mass.

“It’s not Swiss watch precision,” said Gerhardt Meurer, an astronomer from the International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research (ICRAR), in a press release. “But regardless of whether a galaxy is very big or very small, if you could sit on the extreme edge of its disk as it spins, it would take you about a billion years to go all the way round.”

“Discovering such regularity in galaxies really helps us to better understand the mechanics that make them tick,” he said. “You won’t find a dense galaxy rotating quickly, while another with the same size but lower density is rotating more slowly.”

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.astronomy.com