Chameleons have fluorescent bones which might play a role in sexual attraction.

 

Fluorescence is widespread in marine organisms but uncommon in terrestrial tetrapods. We here show that many chameleon species have bony tubercles protruding from the skull that are visible through their scales, and fluoresce under UV light. Tubercles arising from bones of the skull displace all dermal layers other than a thin, transparent layer of epidermis, creating a ‘window’ onto the bone. In the genus Calumma, the number of these tubercles is sexually dimorphic in most species, suggesting a signaling role, and also strongly reflects species groups, indicating systematic value of these features. Co-option of the known fluorescent properties of bone has never before been shown, yet it is widespread in the chameleons of Madagascar and some African chameleon genera, particularly in those genera living in forested, humid habitats known to have a higher relative component of ambient UV light.

 

The fluorescence emits with a maximum at around 430 nm in blue color which contrasts well to the green and brown background reflectance of forest habitats. This discovery opens new avenues in the study of signaling among chameleons and sexual selection factors driving ornamentation.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.nature.com

Scientists are one step closer to solving the mystery behind the ‘most mysterious star in the universe.’

 

A team of more than 200 researchers, including Penn State Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics Assistant Professor Jason Wright and led by Louisiana State University’s Tabetha Boyajian, is one step closer to solving the mystery behind the “most mysterious star in the universe.” KIC 8462852, or “Tabby’s Star,” nicknamed after Boyajian, is otherwise an ordinary star, about 50 percent bigger and 1,000 degrees hotter than the Sun, and about than 1,000 light years away. However, it has been inexplicably dimming and brightening sporadically like no other. Several theories abound to explain the star’s unusual light patterns, including that an alien megastructure is orbiting the star.

 

 

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.sciencedaily.com

Japanese scientists have create a creepy machine that can peer into your mind’s eye with incredible accuracy. The AI studies electrical signals in the brain to work out exactly what images someone is looking at, and even thinking about.  The technology opens the door to strange future scenarios, such as those portrayed in the series ‘Black Mirror’, where anyone can record and playback their memories.

 

 

 

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.dailymail.co.uk

Unstructured learning is an authentic real-world way of learning. That’s because the real world itself doesn’t have neat compartments or set disciplines for success. It demands adaptability, patience, and a willingness to learn and to use what is learned in the moment. Most of all, it requires us to take full responsibility for what we learn.

 

It’s time to play and to let go of rigid teaching in favour of unstructured learning. For this to happen, teachers have to foster trust in their students. They have to be willing to take a step back and put a little slack on the reins of traditional pedagogy. In short, we need to let things get a little messy. Ease into it—it’s a bold step and it will transform everything.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

https://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?&tag=modern-education

 

Sourced through Scoop.it from: globaldigitalcitizen.org

Location Intelligence (LI) is not so quietly becoming a core part of most enterprise business’ strategies. In a survey of 220 data analysts, executives, and scientists, 85% believed that location intelligence would be “very” or “extremely” important to their organization’s success over the next 3 years, with 84% planning on investing in LI technology.

Location intelligence is the path forward for enterprise companies that have become increasingly frustrated and limited by the legacy proprietary systems traditionally used to visualize geographic information, known to many as GIS (geographic information systems).

Sourced through Scoop.it from: carto.com