Here is exclusive footage showing how their technicians disassemble an entire U-2 spy plane for inspection. It’s a remarkable feat because every part of the plane gets inspected and repaired or replaced if necessary. That is, more than 40,000 rivets and 1,800 individual parts gets looked at and then gets reassembled for every 4,700 flight hours. This attention to detail is how the U-2 Dragon Lady manages to fly for decades without issues.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: sploid.gizmodo.com

Researchers at Linköping University’s Laboratory of Organic Electronics, Sweden, have developed power paper – a new material with an outstanding ability to store energy. The material consists of nanocellulose and a conductive polymer. The results have been published in Advanced Science.

One sheet, 15 centimetres in diameter and a few tenths of a millimetre thick can store as much as 1 F, which is similar to the supercapacitors currently on the market. The material can be recharged hundreds of times and each charge only takes a few seconds.


It’s a dream product in a world where the increased use of renewable energy requires new methods for energy storage – from summer to winter, from a windy day to a calm one, from a sunny day to one with heavy cloud cover.


”Thin films that function as capacitors have existed for some time. What we have done is to produce the material in three dimensions. We can produce thick sheets,” says Xavier Crispin, professor of organic electronics and co-author to the article just published in Advanced Science.


The material, power paper, looks and feels like a slightly plasticky paper and the researchers have amused themselves by using one piece to make an origami swan – which gives an indication of its strength.


The structural foundation of the material is nanocellulose, which is cellulose fibers which, using high-pressure water, are broken down into fibers as thin as 20 nm in diameter. With the cellulose fibres in a solution of water, an electrically charged polymer (PEDOT:PSS), also in a water solution, is added. The polymer then forms a thin coating around the fibers.

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Athens is undergoing a cultural turnover as a result of the financial crisis. Some are calling it “The New Berlin” as the next generation of artists and designers are turning to the streets to churn out social messages. In fact, they’re reinventing their city – independent of the outcome – building their own vision for the future. Last month, I was in Athens for five days and managed to hit the street, as well as interview the key players in the scene (who prefer to keep their real identities anonymous)….

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.travelettes.net