For the first time, scientists have spotted large patches of water ice on the surface of a comet, thanks to instruments aboard the European Space Agency’s Rosetta orbiter.

The finding, published Wednesday in Nature, solves a long-standing mystery about water ice in comets. Scientists already knew that the coma – the expansive cloud of gas surrounding the comet’s nucleus – is dominated by water molecules. They also knew that water ice is one of the main components of the nucleus. But until now, traces of water ice on the surface of the comet had been difficult to detect.


“First, not finding ice was a surprise; now, finding it is a surprise,” said Murthy Gudipati a planetary scientist at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in La Canada Flintridge, Calif., and an author on the paper. “It is exciting because now we are starting to understand the upper dynamic layers of the comet and how they evolved.”

Sourced through Scoop.it from: phys.org

All across Cuba, change is in the air. Whether it be the change that accompanies Fidel Castro handing control of the government over to Raul (after nearly 50 years in power), the appearance of small privately run businesses and entrepreneurship, increased tourism from around the world in places like Varadero, or foreign investment, there exists a perfect window of opportunity to experience Cuba as it transitions from a history in isolation from Americans to a future that welcomes them as never before.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: insightcuba.com

LG is creating a buzz at CES with its concept demo of the world’s first display that can be rolled up like a newspaper. LG says they’re aiming for 4K-quality 55-inch screens (the prototype resolution is 1,200 by 810 pixels), BBC reports.


The trick:  switching from LED to thinner, more-flexible OLED technology (organic light-emitting diodes), allowing for a 2.57 millimeter-thin display. One limitation: the screen can’t be flattened.


What this design might be useful for in the future is not clear, but experts suggest the technology could soon be used on smartphones and in-car screens that curve around a vehicle’s interior, Daily Mail notes.


LG is also displaying a 55-inch double-sided display that’s as thin as a piece of paper and shows different video images on each side, and two 65-inch “extreme-curve” TVs that bend inwards and outwards.

CNET CES Videos

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.kurzweilai.net

Teaching means…

…to help another person understand.

…to help another person understand why something is worth understanding.

…to help another person responsibly use what they know.

…to artfully connect students and content in authentic contexts.

…to cause change.

…to cognitively agitate.

…that relationships with children are the bedrock for everything else.

…to be able to see individual faces, needs, opportunities, and affections where others see a classroom of students.

…that you should always know the difference between what you taught and what they learned.

…to model curiosity.

…that students will likely never forget you (or that one thing you said, the time you lost your temper, how you made them feel, etc.)

…to know what it actually means to “understand.”

…to create a need for students to reorganize and repack their intellectual baggage.

…to self-critique your own biases, blind spots, and other “broken perceptions”

…to make dozens of crucial decisions on the fly not per day or class but per minute.

…that you’re going to be needed every second of every day in some important way.

…to adjust the timing, general ‘form’, and complexity of a given content so that it seems ‘just in time, just enough, and just for me’ for each student.

…to help students play with complex ideas in pursuit of self-knowledge and personal change.

…to be able to create an awesome lesson plan and unit–and to know when and why to ditch that plan and unit.

…to know the difference between teaching content and teaching thought.

…that you need to know your content well enough to teach any concept, skill, or standard within it 20+ different ways.

…that you’re going to work closely with people that will think differently than you, and learning to bridge those gaps with diplomacy could make or break your happiness

…to help students transfer understanding of academic content to authentic circumstances.

…to accept certain failure.

…to be a lifelong learner yourself.

…to disrupt social imbalances, inequities, and knowledge and skill gaps

…to confront your own weaknesses (technology, pedagogy, content, collaboration, organization, communication, etc.)

…to really, truly change the world (for the better or the worse).

…that you’re going to need a lot of help from everyone.

…to operate under unclear terms for success.

…to explain, model, and connect.

…to change, change, change.

…that in terms of sheer mathematical probability, you’re not going to be teaching for more than five years (if you’ve already passed that, congratulations!)

…that your ‘comfort zone’ no longer matters.

…your teaching program probably didn’t prepare you well (e.g., your ability to empathize and engage and design are more important than anything else you learned in said program).

…to practice humility.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.teachthought.com