In the last 15 years, design education has dramatically changed. Generally speaking, at the beginning of 2000s, design education was pretty much the job of art and design schools, and mostly had a learning-by-doing approach, involving hands-on studio-based assignments. It was rare to find a design course heavy on “lecture” format classes, unpacking the design process, or…

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By Suzanne Pellican

We started our journey to bring design thinking into Intuit more than eight years ago. We call it Design for Delight (D4D) — because it’s not about the process; it’s about exceeding the expectations of our customers in ways they couldn’t imagine. We realized that not everyone had the necessary innovation skills. Most of our employees hadn’t been trained, in school or at other jobs, to solve problems with design thinking. So, we needed to build the capability into all 8,000 employees to spur on innovation and ensure we create amazing experiences for our customers.

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