Researchers have demonstrated a display that lets audiences watch 3-D films in a theater without extra eyewear. Dubbed “Cinema 3D,” the MIT / Weizmann Institute of Science prototype uses lenses and mirrors to enable viewers to watch a 3-D movie from any seat.

 

“Existing approaches to glasses-free 3-D require screens whose resolution requirements are so enormous that they are completely impractical,” says MIT professor Wojciech Matusik, one of the co-authors on a related paper whose first author is Weizmann PhD Netalee Efrat. “This is the first technical approach that allows for glasses-free 3-D on a large scale.”

 

 

Sourced through Scoop.it from: news.mit.edu

A long-known relationship between African men who harvest honey and a bird called a honeyguide allows both species to get the delectable treat.

 

When humans speak up, the little African birds called honeyguides listen—and can understand, a new study confirms for the first time. Honeyguides in northern Mozambique realize that when a man makes a special trilling sound, he wants to find a bees’ nest—and its delectable honey.

 

Birds that hear this trill often lead human hunters to a nest, receiving a reward of honeycomb.

 

Communication between domesticated species and people is well known, but “the fascinating point in the case of the honeyguide is that it describes such a relationship between a wild animal and humans,” says behavioral biologist Claudia Wascher of Anglia Ruskin University in Great Britain, who was not involved with the new research.

 

“This has not been described scientifically before.”

 

Though the science may be new, the relationship isn’t: Honeyguides and people have been cooperating in Africa for thousands if not millions of years.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: news.nationalgeographic.com

It’s called the Smart Flower Recognition System but it might never have happened were it not for a chance encounter last year between Microsoft researchers and botanists at the Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences (IBCAS). Yong Rui, assistant managing director of Microsoft Research Asia (MSRA), was explaining image-recognition technology at a seminar—much to the delight of IBCAS botanists whose own arduous efforts to collect data on regional flower distribution were experiencing poor results. The IBCAS botanists soon realized the potential of MSRA’s image-recognition technology. At the same time, Yong Rui knew he had found the perfect vehicle to improve image recognition while addressing a reality-based problem that benefits society. It also helped that IBCAS had accumulated a massive public store of 2.6 million images. Since anyone in the world could upload pictures to this flower photo dataset—and no human could possibly supervise the uploads—the MSRA team had to create algorithms to filter out the “bad” pictures. That was the first of many difficult problems facing researcher Jianlong Fu and his team in building a tool capable of discerning tiny anomalies among the many species of flowers.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: phys.org

Overconfidence is a powerful cognitive bias, this is why it happens and how you can avoid it. Research into overconfidence implicates it in impairing judgements across a range of situations including investors’ over-trading behaviour, managers’ poor forecasting, their tendency to introduce risky products, and their tendency to engage in value-destroying mergers. Overconfidence is one of the most powerful cognitive biases because it is so ubiquitous, and causes us to make important judgements and decisions without a sensible degree of consideration. Fortunately, there are some strategies you can use to reduce overconfidence.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.weforum.org