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Pop Chart Lab’s latest poster pays homage to the most important eras in graphic design.

Start at the top, left-hand corner, of A Stylistic Survey of Graphic Design, and read from left to right. Each era (say, Arts & Crafts or Art Nouveau) is represented by a rectangular box that includes several squares that graphically represent the style described. The Modern movement, one of the largest movements depicted here, includes Bauhaus, Vorticism, De Stijl, New Typography and Istotope, Constructivism, Suprematicsm, and Futurism. Pop Chart creates, within each stamp-sized box, a visual representation of that particular style, with the design elements that prevailed at the time. So the Constructivism box echoes the intense Soviet Party posters from the 1920s, the Futurism box has a bold, attention-grabbing arrow on it, and so on.

See on www.fastcodesign.com

See on Scoop.itCommunication design

Suspended from the ceiling of the entrance hall of the Herzog & De Meuron designed Basel Exhibition Centre, the forms that make up Jamie Zigelbaum’s Triangular Series resemble evolved stalactites. Pulsing with light and responding with a unique sensitivity to the people sharing the space with them, 59 large, suspended tetrahedra of varying sizes will be scattered throughout the space to create an all-encompassing, immersive environment for visitors as they arrive and depart the fair.

Constructed from translucent acrylic, a synthesis of custom electronics, including high-power LEDs, advanced sensors and software that allow forms to communicate with individuals in the space, and each other. Each has a luminous respiratory system, and as visitors approach each object, their respiration changes and the forms react. The tetrahedrals also communicate with each other, synchronizing rhythms of illumination through a digitally mediated dialogue. While each form is itself an individual, synthetic organism, together they act as one — an emergent presence that transcends each’s individuality…

See on www.domusweb.it

See on Scoop.itCommunication design

In 1692 an artist known only as “A. Boogert” sat down to write a book in Dutch about mixing watercolors. Not only would he begin the book with a bit about the use of color in painting, but would go on to explain how to create certain hues and change the tone by adding one, two,

See on www.thisiscolossal.com

See on Scoop.itCommunication design

Climate change isn’t just a problem for future generations — it’s already affecting broad swaths of the United States.

That’s the upshot of the National Climate Assessment, a massive new US government report detailing the current and future impacts of global warming around the country. The report is particularly useful in detailing how specific regions and sectors will be affected — and outlining some possible ways we could adapt.

There’s a lot of information in the report, but find nine highlights at the link.

See on www.vox.com