Set above and within a natural stone wall which runs along this length of the Greek Rhodes coastline, Villa F is a design by Hornung and Jacobi Architecture for a holiday retreat. There’s a strong emphasis on comfort and minimalism throughout the dwelling with markedly few distinct rooms and a lack of internal walls.

Hornung and Jacobi Architecture opted for a lightweight plaster coated timber framework for its superstructure, as opposed to the typical tendency towards brute force and concrete cantilevers in modern architecture. A key aspect in the design brief was that it should be possible to cool and heat the building relatively quickly in order to reach a comfortable temperature as soon as possible. This was achieved through the use of lightweight components in its construction, and the incorporation of a mechanical roof vent to encourage convectional ventilation to occur throughout Villa F.

 

Source: homeli.co.uk

 In Bunbury, down the coast from Perth in Australia, the architects at Gresley Abas seized the mission of modernizing a homeless shelter as an opportunity to clad the original building in a colourful and dynamic facade – using metal screens. On completion of the building work, Yanget House now houses 37 apartments as well as stores and offices on the first and second floors which generate rental income that goes toward financing the project.
Colt perforated panels provide solar protection on the east side.

Artist Rick Verney specially designed a 3D relief of projecting, angular elements that seem both transparent and sculptural thanks to the characteristic perforation pattern. The “shadow metal” consists of powder-coated anodized aluminum – the perforation pattern on the screens is not just a key design element, but also ensures light transmission and the passage of energy. The customized design thus spawned both sun shading and an unusually textured dynamic façade that is as good as unmistakable.

Source: www.stylepark.com